Greenifying as Basic as an Acorn

December 1, 2008

There is growing interest in an unusual story reported out of Washington, DC, this week.  It’s not about the President-elect’s latest appointment or what members of Congress are packing up to leave office permanently as new members move in.  It’s about what’s missing from the nation’s Capitol and from several surrounding states.  What is missing is acorns.

"I'm used to seeing so many acorns around and out in the field, it's something I just didn't believe," botanist Rod Simmons said. "But this is not just not a good year for oaks. It's a zero year. There's zero production. I've never seen anything like this before."

The absence of acorns could have something to do with the weather, Simmons says in this weekend’s Washington post.  Hickory nuts aren’t around either.  And Simmons is not the only one who noticed.  

"I couldn't find any acorns anywhere," said Greg Zell, a naturalist at Long Branch Nature Center in Arlington, VA. "Not a single acorn. It's really bizarre."

Zell researched and found Internet discussion groups, including one on Topix called "No acorns this year," reporting the same thing from as far away as the Midwest up through New England and Nova Scotia. "None in Kansas either! Curiouser and curiouser," posted another.

Some have theories about rain cycles. But many skeptics say oaks in other regions are producing plenty of acorns, and the acorn bust in these areas is nothing more than the extreme of a natural boom-and-bust cycle. 

And others say they’re not worried yet. "What's there to worry about?" said Alan Whittemire, a botanist at the U.S. Arboretum. "If you're a squirrel, it's a big worry. But it's no problem for the oak tree. They'll produce acorns again when they're ready to."  Of course the squirrels could starve in the meantime.

Naturalists expect this is an isolated biological event.  But it’s one that bears noting by those of us who like our world as green and beautiful as it is.

And I point it out as an interesting article you can read and also because if we let parts of our living world and food chain slip away, we are all the poorer for it. But we are in danger ourselves.  When greenifying is within reach, we have to do it to protect ourselves and out world.

Link to story: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/11/29/AR2008112902045.html?hpid=topnews

 


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