Power of the Greenified Seal

April 30, 2012

Going green may be the hip thing to do, but it is more than just a trend. Many people are trying to incorporate being greener into their everyday lives and are making deliberate choices such as searching out companies who are green. Which brings me to today’s topic – why the Green Business Alliance Greenified Seal matters.

When you display the Greenified Seal on your website, your windows or in your office, you are telling your customers and clients that you have made a conscious effort to adopt environmentally friendly business practices. In fact, you have made such an effort that you have third party verification – someone else other than you is saying “yes, this company has demonstrated a commitment to going green.”

The Greenified Seal assures the new breed of consumers that the business they are considering is one that cares about the environment and its employees. There are organizations that one can purchase a membership to, but in order to receive the Green Business Alliance Greenified Seal, the company actually has to embrace a green philosophy. This step is enough to create sales and business from environmentally concerned consumers.


The Tale of a Greener Fish

June 26, 2009

Remember a few years back when we were all told we had to stop eating Orange Roughy or we might just run out. Permanently. You remember that, right? We all pitched in and started eating farmed salmon and catfish and a few other things to take the pressure off of fishermen and fishmongers to meet our demand.

Now a website is going to offer advice on which fish has a lower "carbon footprint," or perhaps more accurately, less swishy tail.

If someone asked you which fish of two fish, for instance a yellowfin tuna or a barramundi has a smaller carbon footprint could you tell them? Probably not. And neither could most professional chefs or restaurateurs. It's a hard question to answer, but now a Washington, DC based seafood distributor will unveil a rating system to helps chef compare the environmental impacts of various types of edible fish.

The "Carbon Fishprint" rating system is based on how much energy use and any other carbon-footprint factors were involved in producing the fish and getting it on the table.

Think about the possibilities: you are getting ready to go out for a nice, healthy fish dinner, and when you get there, your chef has chosen two or three fresh "catch of the day" fish selections specially selected for their sustainability and prepared to the highest standards possible. Wouldn't you feel better about eating that?

This is of course, just one more example of green marketing and what the color green can draw in. The studies have shown that environmental friendliness is a selling point that consumers are attracted to and that they are willing to pay a higher, premium price for goods that are organic, use less energy, are sustainably produced and otherwise more environmentally friendly.

By the way, the barramundi has the lower "Carbon Fishprint," rated at just 15, while the yellowfish has a "Carbon Fishprint," more than double at 40. You may want to order the yellowfin at your favor sushi bar a little more sparingly. You can visit ProFish's "Carbon Fishprint" on their website.


Our Amazing Planet

June 17, 2009

Do you mind if I take this one blog to just be amazed at the planet that we live on?  The fact that after being on this sphere for how many thousands (or millions, depending on who you believe) of years that we are still discovering new creatures, new geology, and new events here on our Earth is simply stunning to me.

This past week, there were a couple of interesting stories put on the internet.  These were more than just the “giant squid washes ashore on Thailand Beach.”  They were new discoveries about things going on in the world.

The first one that I saw was about clouds.  Apparently, a woman was in an upper floor in an office building in Iowa when she saw some unusual clouds passing by overhead. 

"It looked like Armageddon," said Jane Wiggins, a paralegal and amateur photographer in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. "The shadows of the clouds, the lights and the darks, and the greenish-yellow backdrop. They seemed to change." 

She snapped a few pictures and cloud experts, both professional and amateur, have been arguing about what classification, if any, these clouds fall under.  Clouds are normally classified as cirrus, which are high altitude wispy clouds. They are the highest clouds.

Cumulus are the mid-height ones, which are puffy and vertical and look at bit like popcorn; status, which the lowest clouds, Stratus often appear as an overcast deck. 

But Ms. Wiggins spotted what may be a new type of cloud.  And scientists are still scratching their heads about her photograph.

Also this week, an article spotlighting a glacier in Argentina is continuing to grow.  You read me right.  In spite of global warming and climatic changes around the world and in spite of ice shelves falling everywhere, the Perito Moreno glacier in Argentina is one of only a few ice fields worldwide maintaining a nearly perfect equilibrium since measurements began more than a century ago.

"The glacier has a lot of life," said Luli Gavina, who leads mini-treks across the glacier's snow fields.

The Perito Moreno glacier is currently 19 miles long and getting longer by the year. 

These are just two small items.  There are literally millions of amazing things about our planet.  I bring them to your attention because sometimes, it’s just nice to take a break from all the doom and gloom to catch a moment of wonder and awe.  It’s a great planet.  And we’ve got to take great care of it. 


Save Time: Join Us on Twitter!

May 26, 2009

We don’t usually toot our own horn here at the Green Business Alliance, but we do frequently Twitter.  That’s right: the Green Business Alliance is now on Twitter.

We’re guessing that you’re web savvy enough know what Twitter is: a social network tool that allows us to directly communicate with our members and supporters like you. 

Twitter is free and can save you a lot of time.  Are you aware that the average American receives 142 unwanted “spam” emails per day?  By 2011, it’s predicted we’ll spend 40% of our time managing email.  That’s a huge amount of wasted effort when you consider how much junk email (aka SPAM) is in our email boxes these days.

By signing up for Twitter’s updates, you can have Green Business Alliance updates sent to your mobile device or log in and check them yourself.   We’ll be “tweeting” about new blogs and articles.  The “tweets” will include valuable information to help you greenify your business better and more efficiently.  We’re hoping to post about other environmental news to help you understand your world and Greenify at home, too.  We believe it will be a whole new era of better communication with our members and readers.

And with the competition for business now tougher than ever, smarter greenifying could be the little extra edge that leads to success.

All you have to do to start this service is to visit www.twitter.com, and set up an account.  Then return to our homepage here at the Green Business Alliance and scroll down until you see the Twitter logo on the right side of the screen.  Click on that to request following our “tweets” and you’ll be linked in.

Happy Twittering!


Want to Go Green? Go LOCAL

May 18, 2009

Are you noticing the increasing emphasis on going local?   It seems to be everywhere with increasing emphasis as big business tries to compete for green dollars by claiming to be “local.”

During this time with our stressed out economy, marketers are looking for any edge possible with consumers.  As we’ve noted here at the Green Business Alliance in the past, surveys have shown that American consumers will pay more for “green,” recycled, or other products with a lower carbon footprint. The effects of that poll have now settled into the advertising industry in a big way.

But what does it mean when the big, national chain companies say they are offering “local?”  Well, it could mean… almost anything.  The sad fact is that the government doesn’t regulate use of the word “local” and there is no legal standard for it.  There is no definition, no set number of miles that dictates when manufacturer, producers, retailers or other businesses can or cannot use the word “local.”

The marketing tactic first hit in the food industry, where “locavores,” as they call themselves, claimed to prefer local food for its freshness and its smaller carbon footprint.
But now the movement is spreading.

“You know the locavore phenomenon is having an impact when the corporations begin co-opting it,” Ms. Prentice said. “Everyone should know where things are processed. The ‘where’ question is really important.”

I’m not saying that the national big box home improvement store that is selling “local lumber” or “area produced seedlings” isn’t doing just that.  They might be.  But isn’t it interesting that corporate America is now interested in changing the green market of those who prefer to buy and consume local products?

It’s great to offer local produce and products.  It’s wonderful to Greenify both in your own life as well as the products that your business is using and offering.  But can I make a suggestion?  Since the government hasn’t qualified what “local” means, perhaps you should.  It may be turn into your own business success story.


Swine Who?

May 11, 2009

By now, we've all heard about swine flu: an influenza that passes easily between the pig population and humans and was believed to be especially virulent and potentially deadly.  We saw as visitors arrived from international ports of call into our country wearing surgical masks as an effort to keep them from acquiring for themselves or passing the virus to others.  The government warned us about the symptoms and how to avoid this strain of influenza by avoiding crowds, learning to cough into our sleeves and wearing masks.
 
Where I live in Southern California, many people are concerned about pollution and particulate matter in the air during major fires.  During severe wildfires, many people protect their lungs by wearing such masks to keep out soot, ashes, and other minute bits of debris.   I guess that's appropriate because Los Angeles remains at or near the top of the lists of the most polluted cities in the United States.
 
But sad to report, these masks are also very useful outside of times when we are concerned about a global pandemic or being downwind of a large fire.   

Particulates are visible air pollutants consisting of particles appearing in smoke or mist. These particles come in "almost any shape or size, and can be solid particles or liquid droplets. We divide particles into two major groups," according to www.AirInfoNow.com. The big particles are between 2.5 and 10 micrometers (from about 25 to 100 times thinner than a human hair). The small particles are smaller than 2.5 micrometers (100 times thinner than a human hair). These particles can be dust, pollen, soot, smoke, liquid droplets, or  a wide variety of other compositions.  And they can harm our health, particularly the smallest ones that work their way deep into our lungs. 

The Environmental Protection Agency warns: "Numerous scientific studies have linked particle pollution exposure to a variety of problems, including: increased respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, aggravated asthma, development of chronic bronchitis, premature death in people with heart or lung disease, and more.

It's hard to think that our air is so bad that we can't breathe it freely and healthfully, but when you see those surgical masks on people coming and going trying to avert swine flu, consider whether you may want to wear one until we can completely Greenify, or at least remove the grey from our air.


Now that Earth Day Is Over... What Are You Doing?

April 28, 2009

Now that Earth Day is over again for this year, how do we go forward with our resolve to be more protective of our planet and its valuable natural resources?
We've celebrated the planet, now it's time to get serious and Greenify in a meaningful way.
 
Here are some ideas that I had:
 
*Car pool at least one day per week.  This saves on fuel and parking spaces at work.  If you're the boss, lead the way and encourage employees to do it.  Maybe you can start by offering to pick up an employee or two on the way to work at least once a week.
 
*Turn off lights when you leave the room.  Every time.
 
*Use recyclable paper as often as possible.  Yes, it does cost a little more, but it also saves our planet a lot.
 
*Dial down on heat and up on air conditioning.  68 degrees in the winter and 72 degrees in the summer (if not more) can make a huge difference in the company energy bill, too.
 
*Intall timers on restroom lights.  It's a safe bet no one wants to stay in there very long anyway, right? 
 
*Eat lunch at your desk.  Saves money and fuel.
 
*Add plants for decoration and pollution control.  If you have landscaping outdoors, remember to put the watering cycles on timers, too, and water only at night.Conservation is key. 
 
*Encourage others in their to Greenify, as well.  Can we underestimate the power of a good compliment to a fellow businessperson?  If they're weighing the importance of their greenification efforts, it's always good to hear encouraging words.  Plus, it does help make and keep friends.
 
Earth Day only comes once per year, but the goal is to celebrate the importance of our Earth every day and try to keep it a clean, more healthful place to live.


Use What You Have, Consume Fewer Resources

April 16, 2009

When I was a child, my father liked to refer to any of his four children as “The Great Consumer” whenever we wasted things.  You know how kids are: we piled our plates high, but ate less than half of the food we took.  We constantly wanted more toys or clothes.  And we left the lights on as we went from room to room. 

These days, we’re all trying to crack down on expenses.  You might start by looking in your own refrigerator.  Wasted food is clogging up our landfills.  According to the EPA, 31.7 million tons of food scraps were sent to landfills in 2007. That’s a lot of dry toast and bad meatloaf.  Those 63 billion pounds of food sitting in landfills are creating methane gases in their decay, which is destroying our ozone layer and cause global warming.

Some folks are getting really creative with it.  The online community is full of talk of people getting all their food out of dumpsters.  They are “rescuing” vegetables, baked goods, and other items from refuse containers and using it in their diets.  And they’re feeling good about it. 

Other groups are taking in leftover baked goods from commercial bakeries and produce that has passed its prime and making meals for the homeless and lower income families.  These food items are often very high quality, but since many Americans don’t like the label “day old,” these items are discarded and picked up by groups such as Forgotten Harvest as well as local and regional kitchens around the country.

What can you do?  Focus on what you’re eating.  Take leftovers to work for lunch.  Make just what you need and eat what you make.  You’ll be happier, less wasteful, and have a smaller carbon footprint.  You also won’t have a father calling you “The Great Consumer” anymore.  


Ready for Earth Day 2009

April 14, 2009

Earth Day 2009 is now about one week away and what is your business doing about it? Have you made any plans to Greenify?

Are you staying open that day or shutting down to take your employees and family to events in a nearby park or civic square?  Have you put up posters for those events and maybe written a tagline on your company’s cash register receipts, advertising what’s going on and where on Earth Day?

National Geographic wants your ideas.  They’re working with Sun Chips to provide a cash prize to whoever comes up with the best Green idea, starting on Earth Day, April 22, 2009 and going until June 8, 2009.  All you do is click here for rules on how to enter your best green idea.  You could win $20,000 to implement your idea.

But what if your idea is small? Is it something you could do now, without any financing or fanfare?  You could spend Earth Day 2009 implementing it yourself.  How about if you use the day to plant a garden?  You’ll have fun in the sun and reap the benefits in months to come.  You’ll help Greenify by reducing the amount of chemicals used in producing vegetables and fuel used in shipping them.  You might even enjoy working out in your garden all summer. 

Other things to do include bicycling to work.  Carpooling, if the distance is too long.  Turning the lights off and opening the blinds just for one day.  Turn your computer off when you go to lunch.  Better yet, plan to bring your lunch and enjoy an earth-friendly potluck picnic with your employees or coworkers in the park.

Earth Day 2009 will be full of exciting endeavors that will only happen on that day. But by planning to do something small, you ensure that you can relive and enjoy an “everyday Earth Day” over and over again.


Greenify Your Business

April 13, 2009

If you’re looking for a new business or to Greenify an existing business, have you considered bicycle deliveries?  A business in Portland, Oregon was trying to figure out ways to make their delivery service more earth-friendly, and they got the idea to start doing deliveries on bicycles.

It’s very old school. And in a few major cities, bicycle curriers are a frequently used delivery system.  But this is something different. 

They use special cargo bicycles. The business is “B-Line Sustainable Urban Delivery.  They’re a start-up formed by the husband and wife team of Kathryn and Franklin Racine-Jones. 

“We hope B-Line can help add green core jobs and create a different type of city.  We’re trying to create a new model of distributing goods in urban areas.”

The duo moved to Portland from the San Francisco Bay area about 9 months ago. They were looking for a place that was open and interested in greener ways of doing business.  Portland is known for bikes and enjoying earth-friendly approaches to doing business.  So far, so good, right?

Their idea is simple.  They’re using specially modified cargo bikes to deliver goods within Portland, also known as “The Rose City.”   They are doing more good deeds than you might think.  They’re using fewer natural resources (although the bikers’ legs might argue that!) sparing downtown streets from the wear and tear of large delivery trucks, and providing a very earth-friendly link in a company’s distribution chain. 

All in all, a great Greenification effort that is truly going the last mile.


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