Greenify Your Garland

December 7, 2008

Is the holiday tree up at your home or office?  It’s what most of us consider to be the epitome of the holiday season: a Christmas tree filled with bright lights, colorful ornaments and encircled around by garland. 

We’ve talked about the tree.  It could be artificial and save on cutting down trees and annual expense or a real tree (considered by many to be a renewable resource) that is either living or recycled into mulch by many county recycling authorities. 

And we’ve talked about the lights.  The new LCD lights are available which cost considerably more, but last a lot longer and will save money over the life of the bulbs because they use only a tiny percentage of the electricity used by the incandescent bulbs.

But what about garland?  As a child, I loved to put pieces of tinsel on the family tree, one by one by one. The tree shone with a silvery sheen.  As an adult, I realize that such tinsel makes the tree more difficult to recycle because the shiny aluminum bits don’t break down.  They are not recyclable, reusable, or renewable.  They just use up resources, look pretty, and are off to the dump.

Let’s consider other forms of garland.  Even an aluminum garland is reusable.  But let’s consider other options.

These days, there are numerous options for an environmentally sensitive consumer.  There are amazing ornate garlands made of hand-blown glass by artisans.  There are beautiful, unique beaded pieces as well. 

But for a truly green-thumbed Greenification enthusiast, there are decorations made the old-fashioned way: by hand.  Imagine the beauty of a tree decorated in a garland of its own fruits.  Collect pinecones and string them together using fishing line.  Add a touch of glitter spray and you’re done.  Leave it natural and use the pinecones to start home fires burning after the holidays.  Or how about a return to childhood roots by making a garland of popcorn and cranberries?  The squirrels outside your backdoor will appreciate you greatly after tree season is past.

It’s a great time of year to Greenify, even in the smallest ways.  And Greenification is as close as your front room, waiting to brighten your holidays from one season to the next. 


Greener Holiday Party Ideas

December 5, 2008

If you’re going to make the rounds of holiday parties or give one yourself, plan now to Greenify.

Going to holiday parties, you want to make sure to carpool, right?  This makes it easier to save gas, save wear and tear on the car, and potentially save lives.  The latter because this is the time of year when we all enjoy seeing our friends and business associates and sharing holiday foods and drinks together.  Carpooling makes it much easier to designate a driver so that everyone makes it home alive.  It’s better for the environment and all of us in it because we all feel better when there are fewer drunk drivers on the road.

If you are the one throwing the holiday party, consider going “old school.”  Even if you are trying to cut costs and downsizing the party from country club to office commissary, forget about the past years of plastic cups and throw-away paper table coverings. 

Buy a fabric tablecloth.  Festive holiday clothes of all sizes can be had at discount stores for prices close to the same as those of the throw-away paper ones, but with far less of a carbon footprint. 

The same goes for plates, cups, and silverware.  You can rent or borrow the same, depending on the size of your party.  You may be able to cut costs if you know a church that rents their hall or their linens, flatware, or other houseware items.  These groups often have the items in bulk and may also be looking for ways to make extra money. 

You could even purchase them at a discount store and give them away (for pickup later, after they’ve been washed) as a door prize. Choose well and they’ll be appreciated.  Such things have been done before by our parents’ generation.  And this time, there’s the added benefit of Greenification. 

If you have to wash a few dishes, is that really so bad?  A holiday party downsized per cost but upsized with glassware, silverware, and linens isn’t going to feel as sparsely provided. 

And your company’s carbon footprint shrinks a little more all the way into the New Year. 


Holiday Colors: Red and Greenify!

December 4, 2008

Have you thought about what kinds of goodies your business will give to its customers this holiday season?  You can Greenify your corporate gifts this season without missing out on taste or quality, while enjoying the knowledge that you’re helping the environment.

So let’s look at a few possibilities. How about some coffee? A nice bag of organically grown brew is a welcome gift in most offices and there are dozens of brands out there.  There is an entire website devoted to the organic coffee association and what their growers do to bring you a greener cup of joe:
   
While you’re at it, maybe look around for a well-made mug.   Your client will save a lot of money if they start drinking their own office coffee from their own cup.

Like chocolates?  These are grown pesticide-free so you don’t have to feel any guilt about enjoying them.  And Sierra Club staffers say these three are the best:
Amano Chocolate
Dagoba Chocolate
Ithaca Fine Chocolates

If you’d rather have cookies, these have all won awards for taste and for being eco-friendly:

Dancing Deer
Bellas Cookies

Liz Lovely

Going low-carbohydrate and healthy?  Try some pesticide-free nuts:

Living Tree Community
Sun Organic
Wilderness Family Naturals 

And if you’ve got a one of a kind customer that is worth “a million” to you, then maybe this next one is for you.  This website offers one of a kind heirloom Teddy Bears made from repurposed used fur coats.

You can show you care about your customers and the earth by giving greener gifts this season.  You can Greenify while greeting the season with style.


Two Quick Ways to Greenify Holiday Giving

December 3, 2008

If you’re like many Americans, you’re feeling the economic pinch this holiday.  Greenifying your gift-giving may help you feel a little richer in personal green. 

Have you thought about recycling gifts?  Yeah, sure, you’ve heard about re-gifting: rewrapping a gift you received but don’t care for in order to give it to someone it may be better suited for.  Re-gifting was made popular (and got laughs) on Seinfeld, the old NBC sitcom.

But maybe this year, you’ll consider buying items at second-hand stores.  Americans have been considered “under-consumers” for years, in that they didn’t use an item completely.  They threw things away or took them to second-hand stores well before their usefulness was finished.  Maybe it’s time you considered shopping in those stores.

Some things you can’t purchase at such a store.  You’ll not please the kids wanting a WII with an old VCR.  But if you’re looking for a back-up vcr for your business’ in-house security system, you will pay a lot less by purchasing a cast-off second-hand player in working order.  

Often these items are cast off early.  In some cases, stores have been known to clear inventory to charitable organizations.  If you can wait until after Christmas, many stores and households clear excess items that aren’t fully used.  (Some people never learn to Greenify.  It’s not in their nature.)  

At the very least, consider something made of recycled goods, like this Radio Flyer made of recycled plastic or a lovely star paperweight made of recycled blue glass. (They have them shaped like dolphins, too but that didn’t seem nearly as festive!)

You can teach your children a lesson about greenification by taking them shopping at a second-hand store, like Goodwill or the Salvation Army.  They’ll learn to appreciate the cost of goods, the fun of giving, and the value of a dollar while they shop.  It’s also a great time to talk about the value of conserving natural resources.

Even if the kids aren’t getting or giving second-hand gifts, give yourself or your spouse or someone else the gift of a recycled, second-hand item and feel the joy of helping Greenify the planet and the second gift of a lower budget.


Greenifying as Basic as an Acorn

December 1, 2008

There is growing interest in an unusual story reported out of Washington, DC, this week.  It’s not about the President-elect’s latest appointment or what members of Congress are packing up to leave office permanently as new members move in.  It’s about what’s missing from the nation’s Capitol and from several surrounding states.  What is missing is acorns.

"I'm used to seeing so many acorns around and out in the field, it's something I just didn't believe," botanist Rod Simmons said. "But this is not just not a good year for oaks. It's a zero year. There's zero production. I've never seen anything like this before."

The absence of acorns could have something to do with the weather, Simmons says in this weekend’s Washington post.  Hickory nuts aren’t around either.  And Simmons is not the only one who noticed.  

"I couldn't find any acorns anywhere," said Greg Zell, a naturalist at Long Branch Nature Center in Arlington, VA. "Not a single acorn. It's really bizarre."

Zell researched and found Internet discussion groups, including one on Topix called "No acorns this year," reporting the same thing from as far away as the Midwest up through New England and Nova Scotia. "None in Kansas either! Curiouser and curiouser," posted another.

Some have theories about rain cycles. But many skeptics say oaks in other regions are producing plenty of acorns, and the acorn bust in these areas is nothing more than the extreme of a natural boom-and-bust cycle. 

And others say they’re not worried yet. "What's there to worry about?" said Alan Whittemire, a botanist at the U.S. Arboretum. "If you're a squirrel, it's a big worry. But it's no problem for the oak tree. They'll produce acorns again when they're ready to."  Of course the squirrels could starve in the meantime.

Naturalists expect this is an isolated biological event.  But it’s one that bears noting by those of us who like our world as green and beautiful as it is.

And I point it out as an interesting article you can read and also because if we let parts of our living world and food chain slip away, we are all the poorer for it. But we are in danger ourselves.  When greenifying is within reach, we have to do it to protect ourselves and out world.

Link to story: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/11/29/AR2008112902045.html?hpid=topnews

 


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